The story of the Goose Fair Ghost - a Nottingham folk tale created by AI

Although this story is make-believe we think it sounds pretty realistic
According to the BBC, most historians agree the fair probably started just after 1284 when the Charter of King Edward I referred to city fairs in Nottingham. According to the BBC, most historians agree the fair probably started just after 1284 when the Charter of King Edward I referred to city fairs in Nottingham.
According to the BBC, most historians agree the fair probably started just after 1284 when the Charter of King Edward I referred to city fairs in Nottingham.

Recently, we've been taking a real interest in Nottingham folklore.

Some of our favourite tales include the adventures of Robin Hood and Wollaton Park's 'secret village' inhabited by magical giggling gnomes.

So we decided to have a bit of fun with our old friend ChatGPT. We asked the AI machine to create a little-known folk story from Nottingham.

And here is its creation, a spooky tale that centers around our annual Goose Fair.

Of course, it's important to remember this is a work of pure fiction but it's fun to believe nonetheless.

READ MORE: Your Nottingham

So are you sitting comfortably?

"Centuries ago, during the annual Nottingham Goose Fair, a small village on the outskirts of the city was known for its peculiar occurrence.

"The villagers believed that a ghost would appear every year during the fair, wandering the grounds and spreading a mysterious aura.

"Legend had it that the ghost was once a farmer named Edgar, who had a deep love for his geese.

"He was known for breeding the finest and most beautiful geese in the region.

"However, one fateful year, a greedy merchant from Nottingham stole Edgar's prized goose just before the Goose Fair.

"Heartbroken and desperate for justice, Edgar confronted the merchant, but a tragic accident occurred, resulting in Edgar's untimely death.

"It was said that Edgar's spirit returned each year during the Goose Fair, seeking revenge for the injustice that had befallen him.

"Villagers claimed to have witnessed the ghostly figure of Edgar, draped in a white shroud, silently wandering through the fairgrounds.

"His presence was accompanied by the haunting sound of geese honking in the distance. Some brave souls even reported feeling a chill in the air whenever the ghost was near.

"Despite the eerie tales, the villagers came to view Edgar's ghost as a guardian spirit, protecting the geese and ensuring that no harm would come to them during the fair.

"Merchants and fairgoers alike would leave a portion of their profits as an offering to appease the spirit and ensure good fortune..."

History of the Goose Fair (this bit is legit)

According to the BBC, most historians agree the fair probably started just after 1284 when the Charter of King Edward I referred to city fairs in Nottingham.

The name probably came from the hundreds of geese that were driven from Lincolnshire to be sold in Nottingham.

Besides the sale of geese and other livestock, it became particularly famous for its high-quality cheese.

In 1766, there was a cheese riot that was triggered by a sharp increase in the price of cheese compared with the previous year. The riot culminated in the mayor being toppled by a large cheese.

The fair has become a fairground annual attraction in recent decades and it is thought to be Europe's biggest travelling fair with centuries of stories.

Almost half a million visitors flock to Nottingham's Goose Fair every year.