Developer loses appeal to build new Starbucks drive-thru in Edwalton over congestion fears

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A planning councillor said the “standards of design were also simply not up to scratch”

A developer has lost an appeal to build a Starbucks drive-thru and office building next to a retail park in Nottinghamshire.

Edwalton Properties Ltd wanted to build the development and 27 car parking spaces on derelict land between Aldi and a Porsche dealership on Landmere Lane in Edwalton.

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However, the proposal was refused planning permission by Rushcliffe Borough Council in December last year over fears it could increase traffic and queues.

The proposed site of the development in Edwalton, which has been rejected on appeal. (Photo: Rushcliffe Borough Council)The proposed site of the development in Edwalton, which has been rejected on appeal. (Photo: Rushcliffe Borough Council)
The proposed site of the development in Edwalton, which has been rejected on appeal. (Photo: Rushcliffe Borough Council)

An appeal against the decision was dismissed by the planning inspectorate on Tuesday, September 26 due to the site’s design and impact on traffic flow.

Edwalton has seen considerable development in recent years next to Wheatcroft Garden Centre, with hundreds of homes built and the addition of a retail park, which includes an Aldi, McDonald’s drive-thru, Subway, Greggs, Costa drive-thru, pet shop and nursery.

In May, Porsche opened its new dealership at the site after relocating from Electric Avenue and queuing cars are now increasingly common at the retail park following its rapid expansion.

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‘Simply not up to scratch’

In their report, the planning inspectorate said “the development would harm the character and appearance of the area” and “I cannot be satisfied that the development would not result in a severe impact on the highway network”.

It was also highlighted that the applicant relied on highway data that was both incorrect and out of date.

The inspectorate concluded that while the scheme would provide economic investment and jobs, these considerations did not outweigh the issues caused and therefore dismissed the appeal.

Cllr Roger Upton, Rushcliffe Borough Council’s cabinet portfolio holder for planning and housing, said: “Officers stopped this application that could have had serious traffic implications and effects to local residents and that as the Inspectorate stated, would have harmed the character and appearance of the area.

“Standards of the design were also simply not up to scratch and ultimately the [planning officers] had no choice but to refuse it.”